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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 871 (some duplicates have been removed)
>>> i'm ann curry. for all of us here at nbc news, good night. country in shock. poland mourns its president and dozens of other officials killed in this weekend's tragic plane crash. >>> they bid fair well to the home of the dallas a cowboys. >>> a triple crown as phil mickelson wins his third green jacket. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with a tragic mistake. investigators have determined that method can call problems did not cause the crash that left polish president kaczynski and others dead in russia. now there will be an inquiry as to why the pilot did not heed the advice of the air traffic controllers who told him not to attempt a landing in dense fochlgt kaczynski's body is now back home where a tearful nation still in stock and a vigil continues around the world. nbc's jim maceda has the story. >> reporter: it began in russia where he led a brief ceremony before sending off the remains of the powe ligs president to his grieving homeland. two hours later kaczynski's family and others not on the fl
-down of a student. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning, i'm lynn berry. today we begin with reaching for the summit. president obama's landmark nuclear security summit is under way in washington, with leaders of 47 countries trying to craft an agreement to keep nuclear weapons out of the hands of terrorists. just getting this many leaders together is an accomplishment but getting a resolution in just two days presents an even bigger challenge. nbc's steve handelsman has the story. >> reporter: president obama's nuclear conference is the biggest summit hosted by a u.s. leader since 1945. planes arriving bringing leaders from 46 nations. security is tight around washington's convention complex. not invited are the leaders of north korea, and iran, whose president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, charged a summit goal is to, quote, humiliate human beings. in fact, a summit goal is to keep iran from getting nuclear weapons. that it might use, or give to muslim terrorists, like the chechens who bombed moscow subways. and al qaeda, who would steal or buy whatever nukes they cou
. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hi, everybody, and good morning. i'm thomas roberts. today we begin with an epic environmental emergency as desperate crews use fire to fight a massive oil spill threatening the gulf coast. officials have discovered a new leak in that damaged underwater well. the coast guard now estimates the well is pumping five times more oil today than they originally thought. meanwhile that spreading slick is 20 miles offshore. nbc's leanne gregg reports. >> reporter: late wednesday, word things have gotten worse. >> late this afternoon while monitoring the blowout preventer area, which we've done continuously since the event began, we discovered a new point of leak. >> reporter: a second leak in a pipe already spewing thousands of gallons of oil into the gulf of mexico. already robot submarines have been unable to shut off the first leak, prompting a dramatic move, lighting the oil on fire. bp successfully completed a controlled burn designed to remove large quantities of oil from open water. >> reporter: it's part of a massive effort since last w
tale. why a german shepherd in alaska is being hailed as a hero. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today we begin with lost at sea. things are looking grim for 11 men still missing after a burning oil rig in the gulf of mexico exploded and then sank. now the coast guard is gearing up to combat a potentially catastrophic oil spill. nbc's jay gray has the latest. >> reporter: while choppers and coast guard cutters continue to search the waters off the louisiana gulf coast, officials now admit, hope is waning that any of the 11 missing oil rig workers survived. >> they may have been onboard the rig and not able to evacu e evacuate. >> reporter: as the rescue effort seems to slowly slip toward recovery, there's a new concern. after burning for more than 35 hours, the platform collapsed and sank below the water's surface. these pictures show the dramatic scene unfolding and now officials are worrying about the potential for an environmental disaster. >> 700,000 gallons of diesel is either still intact below the surface or
for by nbc-universal television it is already easter sunday in rome and pope benedict has ushered in the holiest day on the christian calendar with the vigit at st. peter's. the pope made no mention of the sex abuse scandal swirling around the church but the vatican newspaper denounced a vile defamation operation against the pope. also tonight, other church leaders have plenty to say about the crisis. and its impact. nbc's anne thompson is in rome tonight for us with the latest. good evening to you, anne. >> reporter: good evening, peter. tonight in the absence of any statement by pope benedict there is an international war of words on. between catholic church officials and leaders of other religions over the clergy sex abuse scandal. ♪ on holy saturday, the catholic church is under siege. today the leader of the anglican church, the archbishop of canterbury criticized the way the catholic church has dealt with the crisis in ireland. >> an institution so deeply bound into the life of the society, suddenly becoming, suddenly losing all credibility. and that's not just a problem f
him are asking, what went so tragically wrong? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. with most european flights grounded and passengers stranded across the globe for a fourth day, there are new questions being asked tonight about how much a danger that drifting volcanic ash cloud really poses. and whether aviation authorities may have overreacted by closing so much air space. the pushback is coming from the airlines themselves, after successful test flights today into the restricted zone. meantime, some positive developments this evening in iceland. the force of the erupting volcano itself has eased some and european air control officials say an encouraging ash forecast could allow for more flights tomorrow. nbc's tom aspell leads off our coverage tonight from london. >> reporter: a glimmer of hope today, an empty british airways 747 broke a four-day silence at london's heathrow airport to take to the skies on a test flight to check if it's safe to start flying again. kml in london and luf tanza is germany also launched test flights. all the pilots say it's s
for by nbc-universal television >>> hi, and good morning. i'm thomas roberts. today we begin with terrifying twisters. with two people killed yesterday in alabama the weekend death toll is now up to at least a dozen after storms ripped across saturday. nbc's jay gray has the story. >> it keeps getting bigger and wider. >> reporter: new video shows the massive tornado that leveled yazoo city. the national weather service believes it was a mile and a half wild with winds up to 160 miles an hour it. >> was on the ground about 40 miles here in this county, but apparently for about 150 miles through the state. >> reporter: the devastation is overwhelming. the latest numbers from mississippi emergency management tell part of the horrific story. 686 homes and buildings damaged or destroyed more than 300 of those in yazoo city. >> it was just a lot of noise and debris, and you could hear stuff coming off the roof. you could hear the front glass window breaking. >> reporter: ef live corley and her husband ran for shelter in the hallway in the home it. >> seemed like it lasted a long time, and then it
stranded, a new blow for a fragile economy. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. there are ominous new signs from iceland tonight that the eruption of that volcano which has crippled european air traffic is far from over. scientists just back from a flyover of the exploding mountain say it could continue for weeks. tonight that towering plume of volcanic ash continues to straddle vital air routes leaving airports from britain bryto ukraine closed and stranding passengers in virtually every corner of the world. we have the latest on the eruption and the fallout. let's begin with nbc's chris jansing in iceland. she flew over the volcano today and joins us now from a farm just outside the mountain area. chris? >> reporter: good evening, lester. today was actually the first time since this volcano started erupting on wednesday that the skies cleared enough for scientists to go up in the air and make those critical assessments about how long these eruptions and thus the disruptions might continue. we took an expert along with us on our helicopter ride, and i can only
a lawnmower? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with parolizing plumes. clouds of ash from volcanos in europe has cause add no-flying zone. tens of thousands of travelers on six continents are stranded and officials expect that half of all transatlantic flights will be canceled again today. nbc's donna friesen filed this report last night. >> reporter: this is a cloud of & we're not flying, so it's not like we're sitting here angry or anything. >> reporter: iceland is a forbidding land of fire and ice and this particular one becamive in march. it's like a super sonic sand storm, too fine for a plane's radar to pick up but capable of jamming engines. >> it will score the rapidly turning engine turbins, it will corrupt the bleeder system and the atmosphere in the airplane, the pressurization systems. it has been known to shut down engines. >> reporter: they're predicting that half of all transatlantic flights may be canceled tomorrow. donna friesen, nbc news, london. >>> well, newly released documents reveal how t
. >>> and baggage break, some good news from the airlines regarding outrage over fees. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today we begin with the holding pattern. planes in some european countries are taking off today, but with the sky still unstable, thanks to volcanic ash in iceland, it's unclear how many will actually take off. european officials hope to get half of all scheduled flights in the air today, but travel to and from europe remains mostly paralyzed this morning. meanwhile the aviation industry is losing some $200 million a day while millions of passengers are still stranded. nbc's francis kuo has our reports. >> reporter: thousands of travelers can't get on a plane but they're all in the same boat. >> we're in limbo right now. we are. >> reporter: it's the worst time for air travel since the sept 11th attacks. for the fourth day a massive ash cloud halted travel across much of europe and the other side of the atlantic is feeling the trickle effect. many europeans are in washington, d.c. for the world's largest geography conven
-up job at a parking lot garage. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hi, everyone. great to have you with us. good morning. i'm thomas roberts. we begin with an invader on our shore. despite desperate attempts to protect the louisiana shoreline, that spreading oil slick in the gulf of mexico has now officially made landfall. louisiana's governor has declared a state of emergency as officials warn this could become the nation's worst environmental disaster in decades. there could be untold economic and environmental devastation. nbc's jay gray is in louisiana this morning with the very latest. jay, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the worst possible scenario as that oil did, in fact, move into the louisiana wetlands overnight just ahead of a team from washington. overnight oil from that massive slick reached the louisiana marshlands. >> we are deploying as if this would be a major incident. >> reporter: today a team of cabinet secretaries sent to the region by president obama will direct the clean-up effort. >> my administration will continue to use every s
that bo has done it again. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it was a spectacular explosion, a massive fire and genuine human tragedy involving 11 missing men. tonight, the oil platform that was on fire off the coast of louisiana is gone. it sank today into the waters of the gulf of mexico, and the first thing a lot of people thought about was all that oil. this can't be good for the environment. it's where we start off tonight with nbc's ron mott. ron, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you. we are at the naval air station just outside new orleans which are headquarters for the coast guard operation. they are looking at this as a search and rescue mission, but they are acknowledging they are reaching the tail end of the search for survivors. this morning, the fire that's raged out of control since tuesday night's explosion claimed what was left of the deepwater horizon in yet another explosion as the suspended rig which isn't anchored to the ocean floor sank beneath the surface of the gulf. the air search for 1
? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. tonight, residents of central mississippi are counting their losses and picking up the pieces of their lives after a deadly tornado onslaught unlike anything they've seen in years. officials now believe ten people died in yesterday's storm, which has left hundreds of homes damaged or destroyed and thousands still without power. experts estimate as many as 30 tornadoes were unleashed by a weather system that raked other parts of the southeast as well with damaging thunderstorms into the night. the paths of some of those tornadoes led right through yazoo city, and mills springs, mississippi. nbc's charles hadlock was among the first to report from the scene. he starts us off again tonight from yazoo city. charles? >> reporter: good evening, lester. more help poured into the storm-ravaged region today as tornado victims and their neighbors began the tremendous task of rebuilding their lives. the tornado carved a ribbon of despair across central mississippi, claiming ten lives, including three children. in mills springs, j.w. car
. >>> and rott apple. an ipad theft turns gruesome for one colorado man. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry. today with begin with back in business. authorities lifted a ban on flights in and out of england's busiest airport last night after volcanic ash from iceland kept planes on the ground there for nearly a week. still as runways across europe return to life, there's no telling how long it will last and how long it might take to get everyone home. nbc's leanne gregg reports. >> reporter: european air space is coming to life again slowly. the process of moving millions of passengers who have been waiting for days is now under way. >> i got a flight out today, was on the phone for about an hour last night, and got a colleague, though, that's still stuck in paris. hopefully he'll get home on thursday. >> reporter: the first passengers flying out of heathrow airport since the volcanic eruption left london with mixed emotions. >> i think we're just a little nervous that we're the first flight flying out and just hope we make it
captioning institute] >> jim popkin who worked mostly through nbc nightly news where he worked extensively with workers and whistleblowers. i've represented whistleblowers since 1984 and i've been working with the press ever since, when it is my turn to speak, many whistleblower cases are either one in the press where the employer or the government agency backs down or at least the whistleblower can get a sense of vindication by having their issues resolved and call public attention. whistleblowers have worked with news media from the beginning of the republic and hope will continue to work with the news media and that the association is as successful as it can be. >> our first speaker is rich, a producer with "60 minutes." for 22 years he has been a producer of the show. that show needs no introduction. he has won awards for journalism including five emmy awards. he has covered a wide range of stories on terrorism, the middle east, and exposeas about government and corporate misconduct. he did an extensive show on an investigation on the anthrax debauched f.b.i. anthrax investigation conc
house. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm kristen welker. lawmakers absolutely savaged goldman sachs yesterday during opening rounds of a senate investigation in the bank's role in economic collapse. the senate committee spent hours tirelessly questioning current and former goldman sachs employees, accused them of knowingly and willy cheating clients, contributing largely to the global meltdown. the goldman sachs execs say they're innocent. nbc's steve handelsman reports. >> reporter: goldman sachs' ceo lloyd blankfein denies wrongdoing, but the government says gold man did and is suing the bank for selling mortgage securities while secretly betting the housing market would crash, betting right, making billions. senators are outraged. >> you're betting against that same security you're selling. yes or no, do you think that ought to be disclosed? >> no, i don't think we have to tell them. >> and you don't think there's any formal obligation. >> i don't think so. >> gold man executives celebrating the collapse of the housing market. >> we did
and sends tourists running for cover. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with tea and taxes. it is tax day and the tea party has made its way to washington to protest government spending which members say is out of control under the obama administration. nbc's tracie potts joins us from the national mall with the very late ef. tracy, good morning. >> good morning, everyone. as you're up early this morning, maybe getting that 1040 done, tax day is going to be a big event here today in washington. the tea party express that's been rolling around the country for almost a month now is landing with a big rally here in washington today. amid today's last-minute tax rush the irs admits it's already overpaid in $30 million in tax breaks. >> the tax man cometh. in the next few years, boy, he will be coming with a vengeance. >> reporter: taxes are lower this year but expect them to go up as the government tries to cover massive deficits. >> expecting taxpayers to bail them out when things go sour is simply not acceptable.
beaches in florida. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with an all-out effort. after a day of agonizing delays, rescue crews are making their way back into a west virginia mine in search of the four missing miners from monday's deadly blast. >>> on thursday searchers came within 500 feet of a rescue chamber where possible survivors may be but were forced to turn around when the air became too toxic. nbc's jay gray is in naoma, west virginia. good morning to you, jay. >> reporter: good morning to you, lynn. they say they will get to the chambers this morning. the conditions are still sketchy in the mine. understand they're working right on the edge of a very dangerous situation with high levels of methane gas, also carbon monoxide and hydrogen. a very explosive mix there. what they're doing is pumping in some nitrogen to try to dissipate that. the officials are calling this a mad dash. that's their words. they'll try to get to the survivors and see if they survived what they've termed as a tense blast. families ha
baseball player's amazing path to home plate. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin withholding out hope. coast guard officials are combing the waters off of louisiana this morning searching for 11 oil workers. the crew remains missing after a catastrophic explosion rocked an offshore oil rig late tuesday night. nearly 100 workers have been rescued while four of the other 17 injured remain in critical condition. nbc's jay gray reports. >> reporter: the agonizing wait stretched into the early morning for 11 families in south louisiana. >> we have no idea where the 11 people unaccounted for personnel are at this time and we're going to continue to search. >> reporter: the men are still missing after a violent explosion late tuesday night on this oil rig about 50 miles off the coast. as the search continued oversight, so did the fire that initially engulfed the platform and pushed a blanket of thick black smoke across the gulf sky. >> we don't have is an awful lot of information about the immediate period of time and
. what does he get for driving a lawnmower? -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with paralyzing plumes. clouds of ash from volcanos in europe into a no flying zone causing the worst disruption since 911. tens of thousands of travelers on six continents are stranded, and officials expect that half of all transatlantic flights will be canceled again today. nbc's donna friesen filed this report late last night. >> reporter: this is a cloud of chaos, reaching over 30,000 feet, drifting across the north atlantic and parts of europe, a potentially deadly menace to any aircraft flying into it. all over europe, airports have turned into parking lots. in great britain, ireland, den marx sweden, belgium, holland, all flights ground. partial closures in norway, switzerland, france, and germany. britain's prime minister gordon brown said there was no choice. across the world travel for hundreds of thousands of people has been disrupted. >> we can totally accept why
is going to charge you for a carrie-on bag. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with hope and many prayers. monday's tragic explosion in a west virginia coal mine has left 25 dead and four missing. while desperate rescuers drill ventilation holes into that damaged mine, the history of that mine is coming to light. a startling number of safety citations, some 600 total violations over the past year and a half. but this morning the focus of both a small town and the nation is on finding those four missing miners. nbc's steve handelsman has the story. >> reporter: as the sun set over the mine, the first holes were being drilled down into the chamber were four men might still be alive. it's a tricky job. >> it isn't as simple as sitting on top of a mountain and penetrate 1g,100 feet and hitting where you want tohit. >> reporter: 25 miners confirmed dead, four missing. could the four have survived? >> nobody knows so everybody's going to cling on to the hope of that miracle. >> reporter: the methane explosion was po
p nbc's fran krnbc's fran report. >> reporter: thousands of travelers can't get on a plane but they're all in the same boat. >> we're in limbo right now. we are. >> reporter: it's the worst time for air travel since the september 11th attacks. for the fourth day a massive ash cloud halted travel across much of europe and the other side of the atlantic is feeling the trickle effect. many europeans are in washington, d.c. for the world's largest geography convention. >> everybody's got an extra nine, 12 days in washington. >> reporter: they spent the past few days talking about places. they just can't get anywhere. >> for now i'm going to sleep on a friend's couch and hope that the friendship lasts. >> reporter: the sprint is on to try to get to the boston marathon. hundreds of runners in europe are trying to make it to the famed race. for stuck passengers seaworld is offering free admission to three of its parks. >> obviously it gives us something to do. >> reporter: the only flying for now are test flights that have collected samples from the air space. experts say they don't expect
's astronauts? captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. the body of polish president lech kaczynski is back home in poland tonight. met by tearful countrymen still in shock over a plane crash that killed him and scores of that country's political, military, and cultural elite. outside the presidential palace in warsaw, a sorrowful vigil continues tonight, where thousands have come to pay their respects. while in smolensk, russia, where the plane was heading, there are hard questions being asked tonight about the circumstances that led to the fiery crash. we begin in warsaw tonight with nbc's jim maceda. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, lester. well, few have lived through more tragedy or expressed more grief over the centuries than the people of poland, but even the poles are finding it hard to comprehend the scope of their latest loss. poland's weak of national mourning began in russia, where russian president vladimir putin led a brief ceremony before sending off the remains of polish president lech kaczynski to his grieving homeland. two hours later, at war
for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening from the white house and capitals around the world, condolences are being offered tonight to the people of poland after a tragic plane crash that has claimed the lives of that country's president, his wife and many other prominent officials. in all, 97 people died when the jet went down on a flight from warsaw to russia. tonight the polish government, an important american ally is devastated by the loss of not only its president, but its deputy foreign minister, head of national security, and a number of lawmakers who are among the victims. tonight at this late hour, back in warsaw, an outpouring of emotion continues as thousands pay their respects outside the presidential palace. the plane crashed in foggy weather while trying to land in smolensk, russia. nbc's tom aspell has more on the tragedy. >> reporter: this is poland's presidential jet taking off from warsaw early this morning. on board, president lech kaczynski and his wife, all the heads of poland's armed forces and the security services, and dozens of government officials h
for authorities after trying to make off with goods at an oklahoma store. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning. i'm lynn berry, and today we begin with a complete success. those were the words of russian president medvedev after president obama convened his first international summit in washington. the leaders of 47 countries have endorsed a goal of securing nuclear materials around the world within four years and keeping them out of the hands of terrorists. nbc's steve handelsman has the story. >> reporter: president obama declared his summit succeeded in making america safer. >> we need to make concrete commitments and take tangible steps to secure nuclear materials so they never fall in thanes of terrorists who would surely use them. >> reporter: he opened his mega meeting of 47 nations with a warning. >> the risk of a nuclear confrontation between nations has gone down, but the risk of nuclear attack has gone up. >> reporter: the problem is no longer rockets carrying hydrogen bombs. it's a nuke the size of an apple in a truck or a shipping co
it out for most dozens of decked out bulldogs battle it out for most beautiful. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning, i'm lynn berry. today we begin with hope on the horizon. officials have a plan they hope will put planes back in the skies today, after a cloud of volcanic ash from iceland has brought air travel in europe to a historic halt. today they'll look to carve european air space into three safety zones, allowing at least some flights to resume. still warnings of a fresh round of volcanic eruptions last night could force cancellations for a sixth straight day. nbc's steve handelsman has our report. >> reporter: in iceland, the volcano called eyjafjoll was spewing less ash. the cloud reportedly just a mile or so high. but after dark icelandic officials said the volcano went back to spewing huge clouds of ash. plans to restart some air travel in europe were in jeopardy. airlines had pushed the european union to open some routes. >> if this ash is too thick to fly, then we're not going to fly. however we need to determine and measure if it is too
paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning, i'm kristen welker. today we begin with a good old-fashioned senate battle. republicans as well as one democrat voted yesterday to block efforts to begin debate on overhauling the nation's financial regulatory system. the gop wants significant changes to a reform bill they say the democrats are trying to rush. for more, nbc's tracie potts joins us live from washington with the latest. good morning, tracie. >> hey there, kristen. good morning, everyone. that one rebellious democrat you talked about really threw a wrench in his party's plan to move forward with financial reform. senator ben nelson said he didn't vote for this because he hasn't seen the bill, and some of the businesses in his home state of nebraska have some problems with it. so do republicans. their biggest issue with this plan to reform wall street is the fact that it contains a $50 billion bailout fund that would be paid for by banks, but still republicans say it would encourage the same type of risky behavior that we saw on wall street, leading up to
on a flight to denver. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> hello and good morning, i'm lynn berry. and today we begin with a fresh start. president obama is in the czech capital of prague this morning to sign a new strategic arms reduction agreement with russia. the so-called new start treaty replaces the expired 1991 treaty committing the u.s. and russia to significant cuts in their nuclear arsenals. while the deal is a major step toward obama's goal of a world without nuclear weapons, it also offers a chance to repair soured relations with moscow. nbc news political director and chief white house correspondent chuck chad joins us with more. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as you said, president obama just arrived here a little less than a half-hour ago. he's now in some private meetings both with the leaders of the czech republic and then also with russian president medvedev. they will sign this treaty in about an hour or so. here are the basic details. it's a reduction of approximately 30% of both the arsenals of the united states and of russia, both countries wi
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 871 (some duplicates have been removed)